Thermo-Chemotherapy available in the USA?

9 months 3 weeks ago #60018 by sara.anne
Replied by sara.anne on topic Thermo-Chemotherapy available in the USA?
Excellent summary, Joe! Thanks

Sara Anne

Diagnosis 2-08 Small papillary TCC; CIS
BCG; BCG maintenance
Vice-President, American Bladder Cancer Society
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9 months 3 weeks ago - 9 months 3 weeks ago #60019 by Alan
Joe,

Great read. Many of us have suspected the CT scan does involve some heightened increase to cancer. Of course as a diagnostic tool most of the time the benefits outweigh the bad.

Question, as I am sometime a little slow understanding things. "For the group as a whole, the increase in risk was slight — 0.7% above the overall lifetime risk of cancer in the United States, which is 42%. But for patients who had multiple CT scans, the increase in risk was higher, ranging from 2.7% to 12%." Is my math correct as I read 0.7% increase above a baseline of 42% of people having cancer and 2.7% to 12% above the 42%? Which computes to roughly 42% X 0.7%= 42.9% and 2.7% off of 42%=43.13% and 12% above 42%=47%? Sorry to be confusing I just wanted to quantify what I am reading. It is clear you don't want too many of these. Thanks.

DX 5/6/2008 TAG3 papillary tumor .5 CM in size. 2 TURBS followed by 6 instillations of BCG weekly with a second round of 6 after a 6 week wait.

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9 months 3 weeks ago #60021 by joea73
Replied by joea73 on topic Thermo-Chemotherapy available in the USA?
I understood it as follows.

When they compare those who had CT exams to those who had no CT exams, those who had CT exams increase a chance of getting cancer in a lifetime by .072% according to the study by Havard Medical. But those who had multiple CT exams, ie. 5 times to 32 times, the chance increases to 2.7% to 12%.

It seems that 0.72% validates 1% chance which Dr. Berrintong mentioned in her talk. I will be careful with us interpreting numbers because there are so many parameters that affect coming up with the probability.

But when we consider that the chance of getting bladder cancer in a lifetime is 4% for men and 1.25% for women, 1% of getting cancer somewhere in a lifetime is the number we should not ignore.

As Dr. Berringtong pointed out the use of CT exam is much lower in UK than US.
The population of England is 56 million in 2018. The population in the US 322 million in 2019.
The number of CT exams done in England is estimated 3 million times / yr or 0.05 times per person per year.
The number of CT exams done in the US is 90 million times in 2019 or 0.27 times per person per year. It is 5 times more than in UK. I do not know the rationale of either country.

CT Scan manufactures are coming up with always with more expensive CT scanner with new features such
as more slicing for more detail image. One slice means one xray shot. 64 slicing CT sells about $1M and 320 slicing sells for $2.5M. Radiation dose of 320 slicing CT is 50% more than 128 slicing CT scan. It sounds like the lower number of slicing, the less radiation dose is. It is good to ask to whoever does CT exam how many slicing they use for our CT exam and what is the estimated radiation dosage.

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9 months 3 weeks ago #60024 by Alan
Thanks!

DX 5/6/2008 TAG3 papillary tumor .5 CM in size. 2 TURBS followed by 6 instillations of BCG weekly with a second round of 6 after a 6 week wait.

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