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Is there any truth to intense cranberry therapy to inhibiting bladder tumor grow

7 months 1 week ago #55243 by Cynthia
Richard,

We have no problem at all discussing complimentary treatments here. But we all have to be aware that though some research is suggestive of beneficial benefits of a primarily plant based diet there is no proof that it is curative of cancer its self. No one will argue health wise a diet high in vegetables and appropriate exercise will benefit anyone.

We all have to be realistic about this disease as we have seen people die from what I think of as wishful thinking. The bottom line is that yes we all do want to do things to stack the cards in our favor there is nothing wrong with that as long as our doctors are aware of what we are doing to make sure they are not doing any harm. But bladder cancer has a high rate of reacurrane. So constant vigilance is key, doing all your checkup is key. If there is a reaccurance it is not the end of the world if it is caught early and the appropriate treatment is received.

The other thread was locked because these two were so alike and since I could not combine the two it was easier for us to moderate so I apologize if you took that as a commentary it was not meant to be.

I truly hope that your fathers blc is behind him and that he is cancer free the rest of his life and retires as a world champion weightlifter.

Wishing you and yours well.

Cynthia Kinsella
T2 g3 CIS 8/04
Clinical Trial
Chemotherapy & Radiation 10/04-12/04
Chemotherapy 3/05-5/05
BCG 9/05-1-06
RC w/umbilical Indiana pouch 5/06
Left Nephrectomy 1/09
President American Bladder Cancer Society

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7 months 1 week ago - 7 months 1 week ago #55236 by richard_lv
Sara, thanks for your response.

You're definitely right. Like Cynthia said earlier there is no definite proof, only some observations. All the publications I reviewed showed some kind of positive correlation of reducing tumor but it was not a cure.

We should lock this post also (like we locked the other juicing post that I started). It may mislead people.

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7 months 1 week ago #55235 by sara.anne
And I and lots of others do not drink unusual amounts of juice and I have not had a recurrence in ten years.

Sara Anne

Diagnosis 2-08 Small papillary TCC; CIS
BCG; BCG maintenance
Vice-President, American Bladder Cancer Society
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7 months 1 week ago #55234 by richard_lv
Cynthia,

Thanks for your detailed answer. I didn't save links. I used www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov website mostly.

Basically many studies, hundreds of studies, showed that various plants, fruits and vegetables kill cancer cells in vitro (in a petridish) and in vivo (in living things).

One of links I was able to find was this - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4017674/
(Plants Against Cancer: A Review on Natural Phytochemicals in Preventing and Treating Cancers and Their Druggability)

At this point I am done with researching cancer. I don't have any other links but there are hundreds in that website. It looks like my dad is cured. We'll have results tomorrow but my dad is already able to lift 300lbs, same as before any of TURBTs so that cancer is probably dead.

Everyone can decide for themselves if they want to drink juices or not. We drank them and it looks like it worked out.

(I'll post 2nd turbt results tomorrow when I get them but overall today it looks like my dad beat it.)

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7 months 2 weeks ago #55178 by Cynthia
One of the beliefs the ABLCS was founded on is that knowledge is life saving when dealing with bladder cancer. Trust worthy information is vital in order to make informed decisions right for you situations. In a perfect world it would be straightforward, a list handed to each cancer patient simply outlining the best ten choices, and of course they would be numbered in order of effectiveness. Unfortunately there are no simplistic answers. If as most of us you do not come from a scientific background doing an internet search can give more stress than answers. Just trying to get up to speed on terminology while trying to sort out the sites that offer trusted information is a lifetime study rather than a few days or a few weeks of research for the common person. Let alone trying to understand if it applies to your particular diagnosis. The best advise anyone can give to someone newly diagnosed is this, use what you learn in order to form questions for your medical team.

After a cancer diagnosis we all feel as if something has happened that is very out of our control. Because of that most of us myself included need to find ways that make us feel in control of the situation. In many ways that is a good thing it helps us find the right doctors, change our lifestyles to a healthier one perhaps, or quit smoking. Through diet we can strengthen our immune systems and help rebuild ourself following treatment, as an example protein plays a big part in our treatment during chemotherapy. We can perhaps reduce our risk of other cancers or future recurrences through positive changes. Any doctor will tell you that in order to possibly reduce your cancer risk that a primary plant based diet, exercise, weight control and stress reduction is the place to start. But once cancer has occurred no one of these things have scientific data backing them as alternative therapies, however they all can be with your medical teams input be complimentary therapies.

Asking your doctor for a referral to a nutritionist is an important first step. Nutritionalists seem to feel that juicing is fine only after you meet your daily intake of fresh fruit and vegetables. Depending on how much fruit you used people can gain weight and have adverse impact on blood sugar. As it is filling you may not be consuming the nutrients and fiber that you need holistically. They also feel that smoothies using whole fruit may a option as many of the nutrients and fiber is found in the skin that is left behind in juicing. Also some nutrients in large quantities can have adverse effects on the kidneys or interfere with the effectiveness of some medications. Gastrointestinal problems from a large amount of juice can in some instances result in people losing nutrients. Non pasteurized juice if not properly handles can cause health problems also. So juicing is not a bad thing but can be if you are not someone fully conversant on these issues and how to avoid them.

I read a lot of research on cancer but after your posts on juicing I spent a few hours today researching it in particular. I found sites making clams of complete cures with no scientific citations, but selling various things. I found sites with personal opinion and stories but again no scientific citations. I found testimonials but no stories of people it had failed. I could find no studies from trusted sources or even untrustworthy ones showing that juicing could cure, slow or prohibit cancer growth. If you have any citations from noncommercial sites showing research on juicing would you please post the links to the information here please?

Below are some links to information about nutrition and cancer I thought might be of interest.

Article on bladder cancer and nutrition studies from nih.gov

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4910759/


From the American Cancer Society acs guidelines activity and nutrition

https://www.cancer.org/healthy/eat-healthy-get-active/acs-guidelines-nutrition-physical-activity-cancer-prevention.html

From MD Anderson on juicing

https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/focused-on-health/april-2014/juicing-cancer.html

From NCI about alternative cancer treatment

https://nccih.nih.gov/health/cancer/complementary-integrative-research

From The American Cancer Society on Alternative and Complimentary treatments

https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/complementary-and-alternative-medicine/complementary-and-alternative-methods-and-cancer.html


Harvard on Juicing pros and cons

https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthy-eating/juicing-fad-or-fab

Oncology Nutrition on juicing and cancer

https://www.oncologynutrition.org/erfc/hot-topics/should-i-be-juicing/

Cynthia Kinsella
T2 g3 CIS 8/04
Clinical Trial
Chemotherapy & Radiation 10/04-12/04
Chemotherapy 3/05-5/05
BCG 9/05-1-06
RC w/umbilical Indiana pouch 5/06
Left Nephrectomy 1/09
President American Bladder Cancer Society

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7 months 2 weeks ago #55177 by jones
Hey Richard thanks! I didn't know that about it being a blood thinner. I have two very small tumors 5 mm which I'm waiting to have removed. The doctor doesn't think it's a big deal. Surgery keeps on getting delayed so I'm looking for ways through the juice and other things to inhibit any growth for further growth. until I get them removed. Thanks for the tips about the other juices I'm going to try that!

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