Forum

× Welcome click the New Topic button to post

Hello

11 years 1 month ago #9854 by wendy

[ It may of been what you call an old mans disease


Dear Joe,
No, I don't think 50 or even 60 is old, and please allow me to explain that I am not the one that invented the phrase "old man's disease", either. That's what we're told whenever statistics are discussed, "disease of primarily elderly, white males." The risk goes up for those above 60 yrs, and I'm not exactly sure what the average age really is, but I was under the impression that it hits more people in their 60s and 70s than younger.

As we have all noticed, the forum is not an actual representation of the true cross-section of the blc population, but has many more women, young women and young men than we'd expect.

Wendy

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

11 years 1 month ago #9852 by Mike

I'm sorry to meet another young woman with what's supposed to be an old man's disease


So Wendy does this apply to us men that are over 50 or is it 60 that's old lol. It may of been what you call an old mans disease but I see more women getting this and also plenty that never smoked a cigarette in their lives both male and female. I think there is something out there in the baby boomer area that they have not figured out.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

11 years 1 month ago #9850 by wendy
Hi Lisa,

I'm sorry to meet another young woman with what's supposed to be an old man's disease. It sounds like your doctor already has a good idea of what you're diagnosis is, if he's talking surgery and possibly chemo. Scheduling further testing to determine staging is already underway, so you should be getting some info soon about your exact stage. Thing is...it's difficult to be accurate with the "T" stage, biopsies and MRI's are not infallible tools, unfortunately. The most precise stage is known as the "P" stage, the post-op, pathology specimen. "T" stage refers to the 'clinical staging' which refers to diagnostics and biopsy specimens pre-op.

If a person gets pre-op (neo-adjuvant) chemo, then the actual stage might never be known- chemo can put a person into total remission and it can happen that a person's bladder is cancer free after it's been removed. That's actually an ideal thing, and can translate into improved long term survival.

Pre-op chemo is still debated by some doctors who say post op chemo is just as good. You should discuss that with your doctor and find out what would be your best approach, the pros and cons.

Where are you going for treatment? We have an advisor for this site who works out of Guys London, and I'm very impressed by them over there.

I hope things go smoothly for you.
Wendy

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

11 years 1 month ago #9740 by timb
hey Lisa
I am in UK (Bristol) but I can't really add a lot to what Pat has said until you get access to some more information. Of course you can access your notes here by law but it's probably best to schedule another consulatation so that you can get more detailed information (if you want it - which I assume you do by coming here?). I always found it useful to take along someone to take notes/ask questions/remember things on my behalf. this could be your partner or a friend. the important thing to keep in mind is that there are lots of people here diagnosed at all stages of this illness who have come through it and are in good shape and living normal lives. I imagine you're still in a state of considerable shock. just hang in there. And if you are up to it, find out whatever you can. This site is a great starting point.

all the best

tim

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

11 years 1 month ago #9724 by Patricia
I'm hoping Tim shows up here momentarily ..he's also in the UK. Not sure how it works over there but here in the states we can request a copy of the pathology report from the hospital where the turb was done. That will tell you the type and stage of the tumor and if it is muscle invasive...if indeed it is muscle invasive then a course of chemo and cystectomy is usually recommended. The MRI will show any potential lymph node involvement or any other kind of involvement. Pat

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

11 years 1 month ago #9715 by lisaloo
Patricia
Thanks
The only information I have so far is that I have two sights of highly abnormal invasive cells.My consultant is talking about surgery
or chemotherapy followed by surgery.Depending on wether the MRI scans show up lymph involvment or not.
Hope this helps Lisa

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Not Allowed: to create new topic.
  • Not Allowed: to reply.
  • Not Allowed: to add attachements.
  • Not Allowed: to edit your message.
Moderators: Cynthiaeddieksara.anne

Users

Total Online: 1 User and 364 Guests 
Sjklawi's AvatarSjklawi

Legend: Site Administrator Global Moderator Moderator Banned User Guest

Statistics

Total Messages: 50853 Total Sections: 1 Today Open: 0 Today Total Answer: 3
Total Subjects: 6515 Total Categories: 11 Yesterday Open: 0 Yesterday Total Answer: 3
Total Users: 7775 Latest User: Sjklawi
Powered by Kunena Forum