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chemo

7 months 1 week ago #58832 by Cynthia
As someone who is still enjoying life after a 2004 bladder cancer diagnosis I of course can tell you yes it was worth it. I live a full life with my diversion and can honestly say it has not stopped me from doing a thing. Yes chemo and a radical cystectomy are rough but as I went through it I kept my eyes on the prize getting to the other side of wellness. I don’t know your husbands exact situation but let him know that there is life after bladder cancer. If he has questions we are here.

Cynthia Kinsella
T2 g3 CIS 8/04
Clinical Trial
Chemotherapy & Radiation 10/04-12/04
Chemotherapy 3/05-5/05
BCG 9/05-1-06
RC w/umbilical Indiana pouch 5/06
Left Nephrectomy 1/09
President American Bladder Cancer Society
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7 months 1 week ago #58831 by sara.anne
I moved your post into its own thread so that it would get the attention that it needs.

Will try to answer some of your questions but I am sure that others who have been where are you and your husband are well also have opinions . If the cancer has not spread beyond the muscle bladder removal can be curative. It is not easy surgery but once the patient has recovered it is possible to have a very high quality of life We have had members here who have gone on to enjoy such things as racecar driving and scuba diving.

There are some things that need to be considered with this procedure Probably the most important is the expertise of the surgeon . Your husband would want to find someone who does many of these surgeries a year and who is very familiar with them. You wouldn’t want to take your Lamborghini auto to a mechanic who works on three Volkswagens a year! You should look for someone who does 20 to 30 at least a year.

There are three types of the versions that can be used after bladder removal. The simplest, the ileal conduit, is the one where the urine is diverted into a “bag” on the abdomen. The other two, the “Indiana pouch “ and the Neobladder use a piece of intestine to form a reservoir like the bladder. No matter which diversion a patient has, they seem to adapt and do well.

Please feel free to ask any questions that may come up.

Sara Anne

Diagnosis 2-08 Small papillary TCC; CIS
BCG; BCG maintenance
Vice-President, American Bladder Cancer Society
Forum Moderator
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7 months 1 week ago #58829 by henristl
I should let the group know that I am inquiring for my husband and not myself. He is 76 and a young 76 so overall good attitude. I guess the big question he has is are the treatments, bladder removal etc. all worth it. He feels like he has had a good life and so is more concerned about the quality. At this point we know he has cancer into the bladder muscle and a high grade tumor that has been removed as best it can by a TURBT procedure.

Thanks!

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