• Posted by Mark Rice on May 27, 2008 at 9:32 pm

    Hi all,

    Just got word from our urologist that new scans show that my father’s cancer has become metastatic. She said she was 90% sure and is hopefull that she is wrong. Wants to still go ahead with removal of bladder and prostate to cause any discomfort in future. Also has given us a timeline of about 6 months to 2 years as every case is different. Quite sad at the moment, if anybody wishes to add their perspective it would be greatly appreciated.

    Mark

    Marie replied 16 years, 1 month ago 9 Members · 32 Replies
  • 32 Replies
  • Marie

    Member
    May 31, 2008 at 1:18 am

    Hi Mark,
    I’ve been reading your posts and I’m glad you are with Dr. Jewett now…I’m thinking about you…
    (ps to everyone else – thinking about you too – I haven’t been on much lately as I’ve been so busy with my kids, but I pray for everyone here everyday)
    Marie (it’s really Anne, but I signed on with my middle name when I became a member as my first name was already used)

  • Guest
    May 30, 2008 at 8:51 pm

    Mark,

    Its refreshing to hear he is feeling pretty good right now. The emotional part is sooooooo devastating. Let us know how his test goes, he is having what we call a turb….it should tell what you need to know for the next step…,, Ginger

  • Mark Rice

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 8:39 pm

    Thanks guys. At this point, I think we’ve been through every emotion possible and I’m sure there will be many more peaks and valleys along the way. Dad is actually better – weird as his hip is not hurting him at all. We’ve also been doing our best to sheild him from a lot of the potentials that have been coming up, so emotionally he’s not too bad. Again, I’m grateful to those on here that have given their support and have encouraged a second opinion. I cringe at the thought at what we could have put him through if we had taken the advice of our previous doctor.

  • Julie

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 7:27 pm

    Mark, What a change another opinion makes. It’s a good thing you sought it out. I do hope the Bladder Cancer is Stage 2. It sounds like you are prepared for whatever the next cystoscopy finds. I hope your Dad is coping. Julie


    Volunteer Coordinator
    ABLSC
  • Guest
    May 30, 2008 at 5:19 pm

    Mark,
    Sounds like your on the right path now. Question, what is your dad feeling right now, is he up and about,? And how he is handling everything himself.? What is his day like? Does he have a partner to help as well? Just wondering as it is very stressful on the one with b/c. We can give some help there too!!! Ginger

  • Mark Rice

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 11:19 am

    Pat,

    I think you hit the nail on the head here. In fact, type of radiation treatment that was offered was indeed 5x a week for six weeks. Again, not a lot of info was given regarding such as they didn’t want to overwhelm us with information, they just put it out there as an option which we can further discuss in the next few days or so. You bet I’m going to be probing and trying to turn over ever rock here:)

  • Guest
    May 30, 2008 at 7:04 am

    Ok i think i get it…Dr. is going to do a re-TURB next week right? Forgive my confusion…i can’t attribute it to chemo-brain..I just can’t sleep and my early dementia setting in! I’ve just never heard of external beam radiation therapy without the chemo protocol. Maybe it exists??
    External beam radiation therapy is the main type of radiation used to treat bladder cancer, often in combination with chemotherapy. Internal radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, is also sometimes used. I know my father was one of the first treated for his prostate cancer with brachytherapy (seeds implanted).

    External Beam Radiation Therapy

    External beam radiation therapy involves a series of daily outpatient treatments to accurately deliver radiation to the bladder. These treatments take less than half an hour each, five days a week, for five to seven weeks.

    3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combines multiple radiation treatment fields to deliver precise doses of radiation to the cancer. This technique helps keep radiation away from nearby healthy tissue.

    Anyway i am glad you are at a great facility and you’re obviously a very intelligent man and i know you will question all options.
    Pat

  • Mark Rice

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 5:08 am

    Karen, thanks for the tip. I am a bit concerned myself of the way our initial doctor described the severity of the cancer in the bladder. According to her, it was in too bad a shape to save. I guess next steps for me will be to wait and see what our new specialist says after the scraping on Monday. Good thing is that he sees the urgency in all this and is taking action quickly.

  • momof4

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 4:31 am

    Mark,

    If there is no metastisis…you should all still consider getting the diseased bladder out ASAP… to prevent further spread…did they give the surgery followed by chemo/and/or/radiation as an option? Believe me from personal experience…if we had the option for removal prior to spread…that bladder would have been history long ago…

    Enjoy your good News!
    Karen


    Caregiver for my Wonderful Husband Angelo, who has Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

    Life isn’t about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.

  • Mark Rice

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 4:18 am

    Pat – the doctor did say removal of bladder was a real possibility even after or during radiation. We will discuss next steps in greater detail after the cyst. next week which will also give him a chance to see the extent of the cancer himself. Regardless, our main concern has always been the possibility of metastasis – we need to nail down what is happening in my father’s hip first and foremost and then proceed with treatment and this we are all in agreement with.

  • Guest
    May 30, 2008 at 3:52 am

    Mark..just curious as to why the Dr. recommended the bladder sparing route which involves much radiation and chemo. Probably the most successful program here in the states is at Mass General Hospital but they will not take above a T2 and the former Grade 2 which is now considered low grade. Its a rather difficult protocol and if it doesn’t work the bladder has to come out anyway. Honestly i’m not trying to rain on your parade…i’m happy that the diagnosis has been downgraded. Just ask the questions and how successful they have been with this.
    Pat

  • Guest
    May 30, 2008 at 2:47 am

    Mark,

    Today was a different day, and a different diagnosis. I don’t think there is anything like having a team of doctors that you have 100 percent faith in and you believe in. I wish that for you and your dad. At least for now the surgery that was to happen has been put on hold. Now what was metastisis is maybe an infection if I understand you correctly. Whatever you decide to do now I wish you luck and I pray you will find the way with your dad..If you are still unsure about what your hearing
    get to the bottom of it, until your satisfied.Prayers do work, How could you feel anything but doom when thats all they were implying,,,,now theres a bit of light ahead,,in one second visit,,,,take care, Ginger and Gene

  • momof4

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 2:44 am

    Mark,

    WOW!! If that doesn’t convince EVERYONE to get a second opinion I don’t know what will!!! AWESOME NEWS!!!!

    FANTASTIC!!!!I am actually clapping right now!!! I am so unbeleivably happy for you all!!

    Answered Prayers!!!

    Karen


    Caregiver for my Wonderful Husband Angelo, who has Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

    Life isn’t about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.

  • Mark Rice

    Member
    May 30, 2008 at 1:23 am

    So as promised, reporting back on my second opinion appointment. What a roller coaster ride this has been! Visited with a major cancer centre in the city with a very reputable doctor who gave us a much different diagnosis. T2 instead of T3; recommended preserving the bladder rather than surgery to remove bladder and prostate; and according to him there has been no spread but some kind of infection in the pelvic area. Wants to proceed with a cystoscopy before radiation and this will happen next week.

    So in the past 48hrs we’ve gone from the worse possible news to potentially really positive news. My main concern at this point is getting a firm diagnosis. Regardless, one thing I have learned through all this is getting someone to a major cancer centre immediately. Team of doctors onsite, multiple appointments, and just a good feeling all around.

    Will write back as I’m sure I’ll have more news next week.

    Peace and love,
    Mark R

  • Leigh

    Member
    May 28, 2008 at 10:24 am

    Dear Mark,

    I am sorry to hear your news about your fathers bladder cancer.

    I see that you have had great advise from our forum friends and I am happy a second opinion has been set up for you guys.

    I just wanted to wish your father all the very best with his second opinion tomorrow.

    Take good care of yourself also..

    Leigh


    Leigh, 39
    Dx July 2007
    TURBT July 2007
    RC/Neobladder ,Studer Pouch, September 2007
    Erasmus Centrum Rotterdam
    TNM Classification: pT4 N2 Mo
    4 cycles aduvant chemo Gemzar & Cisplatinum
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