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Bladder Cancer & Prostrate Cancer

11 years 11 months ago #9008 by dar
My husband had Bladder and Prostate cancer, discovered almost at the same time, but thry were 2 differennt kinds of cancers. Ron was diagnosed with bladder cancer first. Our first doctor (Urologist) who did the TURB on Ron said the prostrate felt a little firm but he did not feel any nodules so he thought it was fine. We went for a second opinion on the bladder cancer treatment the new doctor (Cancer Urologist)checked the bladder and then scheduled a prostate biopsy because he thought the firmness in the prostate might be a problem. Sure enough the pathology report came back with prostate cancer. It wasn't that big of a deal because our surgeon had already said he always removes the prostate and lymph nodes whenever he removes the bladder. But I did ask him specifically if the prostate cancer had come from the bladder and he stated no, they were two different cancers.

We are so glad we went for a second opinion on the bladder cancer treatment. If we hadn't the first urologist was going to wait three months and then start the BCG treatments. Come to find out from the MD Anderson Cancer Center Urologist, Dr. Dinney, the cancer was too agressive, almost through the bladder wall and the BCG would not have gotten to the roots. They were too deep. As much as we did not want his bladder removed it was better for him to have major surgery at 66 years old than at 70 years old, especially with his heart condition. I also doubt his heart would have taken chemo treatments if the cancer escaped the bladder.

Darlene

Husband's RC 9/24/07
Ron is 66 yrs old and retired
DX 6/13/07, T1 G3 Cancer
Hospital: MD Anderson Caner Center
Surgeon: Dr Colin Dinney

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12 years 4 days ago #8792 by cathy
At my dad's last bi-op the Dr's said that there was cancer in the prostrate, they stated that this was bladder cancer & not actually prostrate cancer.
Cathy.

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12 years 4 days ago #8771 by momof4
Joe,

I found this today, I think it helps everyone to see what the difference in Metastatic Cancer, and two separtate cancers.

Key Points
Cancer occurs when cells become abnormal and grow without control.
The place where the cancer started is called the primary cancer or the primary tumor.
Metastatic cancer occurs when cancer cells spread from the place where the cancer started to other parts of the body.
When cancer spreads, the metastatic cancer has the same type of cells and the same name as the primary tumor.
The most common sites of metastasis are the lungs, bones, liver, and brain.
Treatment for metastatic cancer usually depends on the type of cancer as well as the size and location of the metastasis.

They can tell if it is a different cancer with a biopsy/path report, where it would show if the other tumor had the same characteristics as the first. For example someone with breast or bladder cancer that spread to the lungs, the tumors in the lungs would be of the same chemical make-up as the original breast/bladder cancer. If not it would be 2 separate cancers, and would be treated separately. If it has the same characteristics it is still breast/bladder cancer in the bones, lungs, liver, or brain......



Caregiver for my Wonderful Husband Angelo, who has Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.

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12 years 1 week ago #8669 by wsilberstein
For many men prostate cancer is a low grade chronic cancer rather than an explosive, invasive, or metastatic cancer. Just like with bladder cancer, it all depends on what the biopsy shows. I suppose if the cells are highly anaplastic (poorly differntiated as in high grade) it might be hard to tell what the primary cancer is, but the cells of bladder cancer invading the prostate should look different to the pathologist than primary prostate cancer.
I once had a urological oncologist tell me that most men in their 60s or older would have some prostate cancer if they had biopsies. It is found at autopsy of many men who die from other causes.
The association between bladder cancer in many of these cases may simply be that the prostate cancer is discovered in treating the bladder cancer.

-Warren
TaG3 + CIS 12/2000. TURB + Mitomycin C (No BCG)
Urethral stricture, urethroplasty 10/2009
CIS 11/2010 treated with BCG. CIS 5/2012 treated with BCG/interferon
T1G3 1/2013. Radical Cystectomy 3/5/2013, No invasive cancer. CIS in right ureter.
Incontinent. AUS implant 2/2014. AUS explant...

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12 years 1 week ago #8646 by harleygirl
My dad was diagnosed with bladder cancer in April of this year, and at diagnosis time, they said the bladder cancer had spread to the prostate. When they did the RC and removed the bladder and prostate, they discovered he also had prostate cancer but it had not spread to the bladder. Prostate cancer was a surprise as no doctor had ever mentioned that this could even be a possibility. Dad had regular PSA tests, which were always normal. So, how did they miss the prostate cancer and how long had he had it? Which cancer came first?

It was never suggested that he have chemo, either before or after the surgery. The bladder cancer had not invaded the muscle, but the doctor is not sure about the prostate cancer, which he said was near the margins. However, he said that prostate cancer grows very slowly and with my Dad's age (80 at the time) he wasn't concerned about any spread. There was no node involvement. But, since we don't know how long Dad had prostate cancer, how can they be sure it hasn't had time to spread? He didn't have a bone scan before the surgery nor did he have an MRI. Seems to me,lots of things fell through the cracks, including the pre-op bowel prep! So, every ache and pain he has now raises a red flag and a fear that some doctor missed something along the way.

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12 years 1 week ago #8645 by momof4
This is the same question I had the other day to "dadhadbc"


So, when I called my husbands oncologist yesterday, (about another issue) I asked and was told that it can be either. It is possible to have Prostate Cancer and Bladder Cancer, and it is also possible for the bladder cancer to spread. Either way he would recommend having chemo after recovery from the surgery especially if it was found in both places. Better to be pro-active.


My reply to "dadhasbc"
Hi,

I am sorry to hear about your Dad, but glad they seem to have been able to control the cancer. Do you live in the US? I am asking because I was under the impression that it was standard to have Chemo either before or after surgery, especially if the cancer metastized (spread) to another organ (you said the path report showed cancer in the prostate)? Was this a separate type of cancer?




Caregiver for my Wonderful Husband Angelo, who has Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.

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